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Myth/us: Virtual Student Exhibition

Myth Us Exhibition

Myth/us features artwork created by 11 senior secondary students participating in the Burnaby Art Gallery’s Artist Apprenticeship Program 2020. This program mentors students interested in pursuing a career in the fine arts and invites them to develop and curate an exhibition of their own works.

The students, representing Alpha, Byrne Creek, Moscrop, Burnaby Mountain, Burnaby Central, Burnaby North and Burnaby South secondary schools, took part in the program last fall. Guided by professional artists, curators and programmers, students created artwork and developed their own exhibition. Due to COVID-19, the students put together this exhibition for online viewing.

This multimedia exhibition looks into the idea of myth, including so-called “old wives’ tales,” legends and untruths. Together, the different artworks examine how myths exist within disparate cultures, exploring fears of the unknown and dismantling perceptions of the past. By exploring different mediums and cultural fictions, this exhibition works to reinterpret the familiar into the fantastical, covering dreams, growth and notions of womanhood. Myth/us questions whether growing up is obligatory, what perceptions are of women, and is the past in the future all we have.

The Burnaby Art Gallery would like to acknowledge the time and dedication of the students and all participating Burnaby School District career councillors. We wish to thank our funders — the City of Burnaby and the British Columbia Arts Council.

Stella

Stella

Time is Chasing After Me, so Please Slow Down

Pencil crayon, marker, gel pen, origami paper, photographs (mixed media)

Artist Statement:

To work inside the concept of myth, I decided to create an image that relates to the human experience. It is a common belief that past and future can control you, and put you inside its own personal jail. These worries have the tenacity to consume you and anxiety follows. Sometimes we believe that the past and future is all we have, and that there is no “now.” The memories and memories to come, followed by worry and regret, pain and reminiscence. The clock that represents time is chasing after the people who are stuck in this lie, or myth. They are stuck in the lies of the past and the future, in a loop of unease. Meanwhile, the people who choose to live in the now are floating above without worry. In this piece I incorporated the use of pictures to represent memories.

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Julia

Julia

The Face of Medusa

Clay, glaze and acrylic

Artist Statement:

The Face of Medusa mask form refers back to the theater masks used in ancient Greek comedy/tragedy plays. The piece borrows classical aesthetics, but depicts a face of despair and anguish, not the rage typical of Medusa’s representations. In the same way her myth has been reinterpreted through time, this Medusa is rooted in its history, but is altered in the way it chooses to present her feelings.

The Face of Medusa is the most ambitious sculpture Julia has made at home, and is hopefully the precursor to many more sculpture-based portraits.

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Alice

Alice

Apsaras

Acrylic on canvas

Artist Statement:

My painting is based on an old mural art in China that was painted in a cave. The painting depicts how we in China, see fairies. The fairy in the traditional story and my work does not have a fixed gender type. This serves as a reflection of our society, how we have gender-fluid, or non-binary people, etc. The dragon on the left side of the painting is a symbol that represents males in China, and the water lilies represent females. I had chosen to combine these elements to show that no gender should be treated differently, as they are equally important.

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Rachel

Rachel

Renovation

Watercolour

Artist statement:

This artwork relates to my personal background. In the center of my painting is a Chinese goddess. The original myth is about a goddess who tried to fix the sky with rainbow stones. She needed to repair the sky because it had been damaged by others. This inspired me to paint this goddess who is repairing the environment that has been damaged by us. Guided by this, I also drew plastic bottles and waves to show the pollution in the ocean. Since many of us don't pay much attention to environmental protection, I hope my work can be a wake-up call to people.

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Isabel

Isabel

Headless Mule

Media: acrylic paint and fabric

Artist statement:

I am a student and I am easily influenced. People tell me what I should and should not do but at the end of the day I am left with myself. I just want to go in my brain and clean all the spider webs that cover my own wishes. I grow and watch the world grow and my head is the most important place.

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Kate

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Kate

Moon Goddess

Watercolour, ink, animation

Artist statement:

When trying to think of what to draw, an image of an angel came to my mind. The typical image of an angel, of course, has white wings and a halo, but beyond that they’re always shown as beautiful, blonde, white women. The media has always been oversaturated with white people and less so of people of colour, especially those who are shown in a positive light without stereotypes.

Though she’s not obviously an angel I still think of her as one. While drawing this piece, many things changed, but the one idea that remained was that she was going to be a person of colour. I believe in the power and importance of representation in the media and I want to support that.

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Annie

Annie

Untitled

Mixed media collage

Artist statement:

No statement

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Sophia

Sophia

Possessions of Greed

Watercolour and ink

Artist statement:

My work explores the relationship between greed and universality of myths. With influences of the Greek and Roman mythology about an overly possessive king named Midas, new insights have been crafted from the influence. The story explains that the king wished that all he touched might turn to gold, but he nearly starved to death because of his gluttony. My piece explains the myth about how greed can turn humans into monsters lost in nowhere.

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Elisabeth

Elisabeth

Untitled

Textile and paper

Artist statement:

No statement

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Iva

Iva

Under The Spell

Watercolour, acrylic and ink

Artist statement:

In present days, it feels like the whole world is under a “magic spell.” This work takes a popular evil fairy tale character from Eastern European culture — Baba Yaga or Granny Yaga — to represent an invisible force that takes over the modern world. The green cloth and the navy blue background represent our planet’s nature and its powerful impact on humans and all living creatures on Earth. Like every fairy tale, there is a constant battle between good and evil; only time will tell which force will prevail.

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Luvz

Luvz

One to the Next

Coloured pencil, acrylics, stonehedge, pins

Artist Statement:

I am a senior student artist interested in visual storytelling. I created One to the Next, to capture the conflicting emotions of children entering into adulthood. Inspired by my own progression into post-secondary endeavors, I wanted the piece to reflect how difficult and chaotic the transition actually can be. Some teenagers are confronted with facing a different reality, which evokes feelings of loss of self. Although becoming an adult is depicted with freedom and power, there is still the pain of proving self-worth.

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