Close

Hot Weather in Store for Southwestern BC

Posted July 13, 2018

While hot and sunny conditions are welcomed news for most, Environment and Climate Change Canada and Medical Health Officers are reminding residents to take precautions to protect themselves from the heat. Keep cool by:

  • Spending time in an air-conditioned facility (such as a shopping centre, library, community centre or restaurant) for at least several hours every day.
  • Dress for the weather by wearing loose, light-weight clothing. Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses.
  • Avoid sunburn, stay in the shade or use sunscreen with SPF 30 or more
  • NEVER leave children or pets alone in a parked car.
  • Check in on others - People living alone are at high risk of severe heat related illness.  
 > Home > Things To Do > Arts & Heritage > Burnaby Art Gallery > Exhibitions > Ward Teulon: Growing Season

Things To Do

Was this page helpful? Yes | No

Ward Teulon: Growing Season

Growing Season
June 8-September 2, 2015
Bob Prittie Library (Metrotown), McGill Library and Stride Studios (Burnaby Village Museum)

This summer's Burnaby Art Gallery offiste exhibitions present photographs by urban farmer and photographer Ward Telon. Growing Season features the inventive structures of Burnaby's urban gardens, their bountiful harvest and their busy pollinators.

Born and raised on a farm, Ward Teulon studied agriculture and worked as a professional agrologist for over 10 years. As the first urban farming business in Vancouver, Reulon has been designing, building and maintaining food gardens since 2007. He has written and published over 50 full-feature articles in gardening magazines, including hundreds of photographs of the plants and animals that can be found in an urban garden.

Public Program

Garden Party and Artist Talk
June 27, 2-4 pm., Burnaby Village Museum
Tour the backyard garden displays, photo exhibits, and enjoy live music and refreshments. Featuring artist talk with Ward Teulon, Burnaby and Region Allotment Garden Association (BARAGA) and other local urban farmers.

Thank-you to our print sponsor
Hemlock Printers